Dad Holiday Tips (Part 2)

Slow down and embrace the holidays with your daughter this year.

You can do it more effectively with time than with money and stuff.

Here, from my book The Dads & Daughters Togetherness Guide: 54 Fun Activities to Help Build a Great Relationship, are 5 more Dads & Daughters Tips for the Holiday season. 

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Dad Holiday Tips (Part 1)

Year-end Holidays can make wonderful experiences and memories for dads, daughters and stepdaughters. They can also be stressful, and whip by incredibly fast.

Here are a few things to keep in mind for making the most of your Holiday.  (These tips work just as well for sons, if you have them—and for moms, too!)

Five of my 10 Tips today--look for the rest in my next post!

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Dads & Daughters Gratitude

JK_and_kids_at_Dunedin.jpgSometimes we’re so busy trying to get though today’s crazed schedule—or preparing for tomorrow’s and the next day’s—that we forget to talk about the most important things. Especially at this time of year.

Here’s a quick and simple exercise, appropriate for Thanksgiving week, to better understand how important you and your daughter or stepdaughter are to each other.

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Help for Men Who Have Loved Ones with Eating Disorders

On 11/14/14, I did a Twitter Chat with the Academy for Eating Disorders on this subject.
Here is the Storify from the chat: http://sfy.co/azks

man_listening_in_group.jpgMen who have a loved one struggling with eating disorders report feeling impotent in the presence of an illness they describe as irrational, unpredictable, cunning, powerful, stubborn, clever, baffling, devious, unfair and unjust. They struggle to understand and articulate how the eating disorder crisis affects their own lives. They are angry and grieving over how the illness’s arrival altered relationships with their loved ones and hijacked their families.

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Part of the Solution

What do we tell our sons about the birds and the bees? Thanks to Robin Farr and Dr. James Emmett, I just read a compelling letter from a father to his six-year-old son--about sexual violence.

I’ve considered what you and I might talk about regarding dating and sex. I know that I want you to treat girls with respect.  That, no matter what, she feels safe in your company and that whatever behaviour you engage in is something you both want.

And for the longest time that, plus a healthy dose of biological information, seemed to be good enough. But not anymore. I see now that it’s not enough to hope you don’t grow up to be a rapist. My vision for your future needs to be bigger.

I want you to grow up to be a boy who stands up when someone makes a demeaning comment about a girl. I want you to be a man who speaks up when you see sexual harassment at work. I want you to be an example of how men are supposed to treat women. That you become part of the solution to violence against women, and not sit silently by and be part of the problem.

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