Read to Her (Part 2)

Dad-Daughter reading is fun, develops key skills, and creates good bonding time.  Here are three simple tips:

Be patient. If you’ve ever tried to learn a new language as an adult, you understand how incredible it is for a pre-schooler to learn to speak and read her own language. It takes time! Play with letters together, help her learn them and manipulate them. Most kids learn to read at their own pace with encouragement and exposure to letters and books.

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Read to Her (Part 1)

Don't ever underestimate the influence you have on your daughter or stepdaughter.  A big area of influence is developing a love of reading.

From her earliest days, read stories to your daughter. They can be stories from a picture book, the newspaper, or anyplace else. 

Even your infant daughter needs to hear your voice, and if she hears you reading, you help connect her to the excitement of the written word. 

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Your Daughter's Voice

A girl feels good about herself when she is loud and bold. Too often, she runs into the notion (sometimes reinforced by Dad) that loud behavior is not ladylike. 

As she approaches adolescence, she hears that it’s unattractive to recognize your own needs and speak up openly for them. People (sometimes within her family) begin seeing her as a sexual object rather than as a person. She begins to wear the gender straight-jacket that squeezes out her breath while rewarding her more for her looks, passivity and being soft-spoken than for her passions, insights and beliefs.

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10 Famous Women on International Women's Day!

Today is International Women's Day, declared by the United Nations. It reminds me of the hardest-to-do activity in the Dads & Daughters® workshops I do around the country.

It's called "10 Famous Women."  

(Hint: This is Ida. B. Wells)

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Dad + Daughter = Less Gender Stereotyping

MI_speedway.jpgFor 20 years, I've shared stories of dads and daughter which show how having a daughter or stepdaughter can (and should) change a man's perspective on our culture's treatment of women, and gender equity in particular.

Researchers Emily Fitzgibbons Shafer and Neil Malhotra have some data to support this idea, reported in the journal Social Forces (90 (1): 209-222), .

They report that both men who have children (regardless of the child's gender) show a decrease in support for traditional gender roles, but that men who have daughters show a much steeper decline.

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